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Nate The Surveyor

Well-Known Member
The barn: Has rafters, made from logs. Has several cables, holding it together, so it does not splat out, with the ridge going down.
And, the whole thing is leaning against the tree. If the tree fell, it would fall.
N
 

Aaron S

Active Member
I have so many questions... There is no external power source? Is this a non-permanent setup where you take the T2 down every day to charge it? What is the useful range of a TCP connection, and what do you need besides the T2 to do this?
 

Sdrake14

Active Member
Yes Aaron this is something I put up and take down daily. My use of this has been off and on over 4 years.....testing, trying, improving. The Jfield interface has gone through changes and updates and has improved a lot to make it more and more usable on a regular basis. Originally I worked it out just learning how to configure the TCP port at home through my router using my android phone as a wifi hotspot for the rover to connect to the port and receive correction. The battery would go so then learned to plug phone in LS to keep charged but soon just bought a wifi jetpack which is the best way.

After success learning and using it for survey I then graduated to talking a boss into bolting a threaded post to the office wall. (similar to current set-up)
I configured that router and then would use it for many surveys in Arizona for about a 17 mile radius with success. The post I used was just a section of range pole, with a spare section of ladder kept behind a hedge to put up and down daily.

So that said you really just need to configure your router (wifi connection) to port forward the correction and have a wifi internet connection (like smart phone or jetpack) to recieve at the rover. That is the basic.

Range wise I am still theorizing and experimenting on how far I can push it but have done surveys up to 18 miles out and noticed no adverse results.

My understanding from the conventional thinking on GPS is that anything over 10 mile starts to see some kind of atmospheric errors introduced.

But depending on where you are....you know in the boondocks the limits of closure is a little looser so maybe....
 

Sdrake14

Active Member
I don't see a limit with the jetpack except where you may not have phone service. Now I have in the past been spooked by "whoa long baselines....look out....." I found this in a Trimble manual on RTK
critical range.PNG
I also took the NGS OPUS Projects course in 2016 and after 16 pages of discussion of the effects of atmosphere, and length (made my head swim) this was the final take away...

OPUS Baseline length.PNG


So I am like well the only range limit I see is how much backbone do you have and how solid is your survey procedures.....anyone of you guys more knowledgeable on these things than me correct me if I am wrong.

Meanwhile, I think I'll go check some control 35 miles out and see.
 

Sdrake14

Active Member
I also upgraded the clamp mount with heavier gauge steel and JB weld to try and minimize wind vibration effects so I can get higher rod moving the antenna further from the roof.

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Phillip Lancaster

Active Member
IMHO, Longer baselines means longer to fix. Keeping that base close is ideal. Really depends on tree coverage. I try not to go over 10 miles or if there is heavy tree coverage past 7 miles. If it does then I just set a nail off my CORS and setup my T1 on that nail and make it my local CORS. I have taken an 18 mile shot and it was within less than a tenth H and .14' V. I have also done a demonstration to a guy that was over a nearby towns sewer department that was looking for some GPS to buy. I showed him with the LS connected to my home CORS at about a 34 mile baseline. It was in the wide open so it wasn't much of a surprise. But I was ready to setup the radio base. I accidentally logged into my Home CORS once thinking it was my local T1 (was not paying attention to the IP's) it was 80 some odd miles away. I was in the centerline of a road cussing the LS on why it wasn't fixing faster. It was like .14' H off of local. I have been told it has a lot to do with the same weather at the base and rover at the same time. All boils down to this. There is nothing better than having a base that is close and one that you can pull data off for DPOS.
 

Sdrake14

Active Member
IMHO, Longer baselines means longer to fix. Keeping that base close is ideal. Really depends on tree coverage. I try not to go over 10 miles or if there is heavy tree coverage past 7 miles. If it does then I just set a nail off my CORS and setup my T1 on that nail and make it my local CORS. I have taken an 18 mile shot and it was within less than a tenth H and .14' V. I have also done a demonstration to a guy that was over a nearby towns sewer department that was looking for some GPS to buy. I showed him with the LS connected to my home CORS at about a 34 mile baseline. It was in the wide open so it wasn't much of a surprise. But I was ready to setup the radio base. I accidentally logged into my Home CORS once thinking it was my local T1 (was not paying attention to the IP's) it was 80 some odd miles away. I was in the centerline of a road cussing the LS on why it wasn't fixing faster. It was like .14' H off of local. I have been told it has a lot to do with the same weather at the base and rover at the same time. All boils down to this. There is nothing better than having a base that is close and one that you can pull data off for DPOS.
I agree Philip there is nothing like a close base. Ideally, I want to have the base at the house cooking with one in my pack the way you do. I also think I want it to be permanently mounted with the snow cone. Are you using a different type of receiver than T2 for your CORS?
 

Phillip Lancaster

Active Member
I agree Philip there is nothing like a close base. Ideally, I want to have the base at the house cooking with one in my pack the way you do. I also think I want it to be permanently mounted with the snow cone. Are you using a different type of receiver than T2 for your CORS?
Yes a Delta with a snow cone. Thing is a powerhouse. Only problem you will have is the internet. It's been running since day one and hasn't shut off at a guess of 6± years ago.
 

Sdrake14

Active Member
Yes a Delta with a snow cone. Thing is a powerhouse. Only problem you will have is the internet. It's been running since day one and hasn't shut off at a guess of 6± years ago.
Nice! That is what I am talking about. Is it LAN or WLAN? Do you have a fixed IP or dynamic? What router and provider do you use?
 

Phillip Lancaster

Active Member
Static IP (cost like a few dollars more), Lan, ASUS router on suddenlink. I would not even consider anything wireless if I could help it (I had a jetpack on the LS but now have internal, big difference). But in your case I would hard wire power and wifi off a static IP. Leave that thing up there. Bluetooth will probably reach to start and stop the base. Its a pain but far less than having to control it through Netview. Then you can join the club of CORS users and we can complain to JAVAD with support on CORS via DPOS. No really just Bluetooth the start and ending the base.
 
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Sdrake14

Active Member
Thanks Philip. Good info. I intend to join once I cam justify the purchase. I was thinking of a second T2 but pondering going full CORS I think your testimony sealed it.
 
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