Hixon Prism Poles

#3
I'm an old hixon fan, and user.
I have 25', 20', 16' and 12'
The LS is a little heavy for the smallest section, fully extended. I use the 12' one almost exclusively. Also bipod, and leg clips. HR is 5.1' all the way down. You can put a piece of pvc on it, to raise the lowest setting.
I do fully extend the smallest portion of the pole, especially for shooting roof corners. I made a profile for roof corners. 10" delay, 15 or 20 confidence. Raw ppk is on, I forget what all.
Truth is, there's MUCH more to the story than pole height. Folks tell me that lots of multipath comes from the ground. Tall pole heights are not always beneficial.
Anyway, I use the 20' pole for radio mast. It got blown over in a huge wind, about 15 yrs ago. So it's not straight. A tall antenna drasticly improves range. More later kids calling, and climbing on me....
 
#4
Ok, I'm back. The size (diameter) of the 12' pole is 1.25" (1-1/4"). This allows the standard bipod clips to fasten to the pole. The 16' pole is 1-1/2" dia. Now, the bipod clips won't work. Plus, it weighs more.
I have the flash light on the bottom of the LS set to flash, with the clicks. I honestly thought I'd use the Javad app a lot, to control the LS, in mi-fi mode. It tends to wear out my cell phone battery. So,
If I were to do this, I'd need external batt for my cell, and, a modified bipod clip, to hold bipod legs, and additional power for cell.
I just have never bothered. The LS is awful good, without more height.
If I needed it, I'd do it, but so far haven't.
If I did lots of topo, and all, maybe.
So far, I have not needed it.
Nate
 
#5
Great info. Sounds like the 12' pole is the way to go. 16' would be neat to have, but I think use would be limited, especially if the weight is significant.

Thanks for the info, in comparison to SECO, would you say its feels tighter our about the same fully extended?
 
#6
I have used a seco, 12' heavy duty, for a short time. It was heavier. But, the small tube was larger.
The bubbles on hixon stay adjusted very well. Minor adjust every yr or 3.
Of course, I take them apart, put orange high heat silicone in the threads, and this keeps salt out.
I must have over 10 hixon poles. The poles are not graduated. I use a permanent marker, to make a mark at 6.1' and 7.1'.
I have considered going carbon fiber. 8' pole. Carbon fiber bipod, with little weights in the feet.
Hixon makes a quality product. But, the smaller tube is a little light.
N
 

Jim Frame

Active Member
#7
Carbon fiber bipod, with little weights in the feet.
You might want to weigh (pun intended) the cost/benefit ratio of that approach. The standard Seco 5217 aluminum bipod weighs 4.25 lb., and the 5219 carbon-fiber bipod weighs 4.10 lb. That's a savings of about 2.4 ounces, at a cost of about $39 per ounce. That's a fair bit of expense for not much of a weight savings, and you're planning to add weight to it anyway.

I got excited when Seco announced the carbon-fiber bipod until I looked at the specs. I'm all for reducing the amount of weight I haul around, but the difference in this case just isn't enough to justify the expense for me.
 

toivo1037

Active Member
#9
You might want to weigh (pun intended) the cost/benefit ratio of that approach. The standard Seco 5217 aluminum bipod weighs 4.25 lb., and the 5219 carbon-fiber bipod weighs 4.10 lb. That's a savings of about 2.4 ounces, at a cost of about $39 per ounce. That's a fair bit of expense for not much of a weight savings, and you're planning to add weight to it anyway.

I got excited when Seco announced the carbon-fiber bipod until I looked at the specs. I'm all for reducing the amount of weight I haul around, but the difference in this case just isn't enough to justify the expense for me.
I have both bipods. Now you have me curious, as the weight difference seems much more than that.

I don't think I have a scale that will do that though, the postal scale only goes to 1lb, and the fat-person scale isn't that accurate.
Investigation is needed.

I will say the durability of the seco carbon bipod leaves alot to be desired. (well as do most carbon fiber poles.)
 
#10
Bosch makes an aluminum tripod that you can at building supply stores for about $50. It weighs about 5.3 pounds. (Price per ounce = $0.60!)
I am using them for my base and raido. At that price you can remove a leg and make it a bipod.