Let's discusses J-Tip

Nate The Surveyor

Well-Known Member
I have been using J-Tip for several years now. It is not my PRIMARY metal detector. It is the one I carry into remote places, when carrying stuff is hard.

I have also gone to using a Estwing 28 ounce hammer, as I can dig with it, hang it onto my loop on the side of my vest. It is heavy enough to drive most markers, and the waffle head is good. This reduces my overall load.

Well, I have used:
Schonstedt, GA 52 (Old Simple one, Dad's favorite)
Schonstedt, GA 52B (Has Nulling, directly over target.) This was the first one I had ever bought. I LEARNED to make the "Nulling" "Feature" work for me. But, it DID take more time to pay attention to what it is doing. Dad Never really liked it. He was confused by it. The "Feature" of Nulling made it less useful.

Then, I bought a Schonstedt GA 92. This is their "Pistol" unit. It was my favorite one.... in a way, because it could stay in my ATV box, and it was easier to carry. However, it has broken on me twice, and been fixed twice. It is now broken, and sitting on the shelf. If I knew where to send it, to get it fixed well, I'd do it. However, the size of the search "cloud" was sort of small. A metal detector that is WITH me, is better than one in the truck.

I also bought a Chris Nik, "Hound Dog". This was the OLD style one. It had a S-L-O-W sweep speed. Meaning, it could not be used with a fast sweep speed. In traffic, a FAST sweep speed is Critical, so you don't MISS a signal. I returned the "Hound Dog". Chris Nik said "O!, I can send you a FASTER unit". He said. I declined.

Then, I bought a Shonstedt GA-72. This is my backup unit. It is lighter, but NOT tougher than a GA-52.

At this point, I bought a J-Tip. It works, but it does NOT behave consistently, such as, SET a piece to metal, and systematically learn it. I have learned that it has automatic features, that make changes as you use it, and that is how it is intended to work.

So, I then bought a Subsurface Instruments LONG pole. (5 ft Long) It works, but it is not really GREAT. Also, search "Cloud" or "Bubble" is not large.

Finally, I bought a Schonstedt GA-52CX. This one uses 2, 9 volt batteries.
This is by far my FAVORITE metal detector.
It is very FAST. (This means it responds well, with a high sweep speed) It makes a BIG search bubble. And it is also lighter. It is also the LOUDEST metal detector I have ever seen or used.

So, how does all this fit into my discussion?
I can tell you what I'd like.
I'd like the J-Tip to work JUST like the GA-52CX. I'd like it to have a small collapsible telescoping handle. With Cell phone holder. I'd like it to simply "Turn on the app" when the J-Tip is turned on, and be just as ready as a Schonstedt in seconds. I'd like it to RETAIN settings, so it can be all set up, then go within range of the big dog, and allow me to work SOUND ONLY. Not having to watch the screen. Places I work sometimes have big Rottweilers, and Dobermans. It needs to double as a good protection stick, for big dogs, so that a big dog biting it, won't hurt it.

I'd like the same HIGH SPEED, (Fast response) as my GA-52CX. I'd like it to be loud. And, give a BIG search cloud. (I know sound levels will be related to the speaker on the cell phone).

I'd like it to ONLY make changes when I MAKE THEM. None of this "Automatic changes". I work in MANY environments. I want it to have a good tough shell, so that it is long lasting, and reliable.
A good metal detector is simple, fast, has large search cloud, and I am ok with all the "Javad Features". But, don't default to that. Make that thing work for me. NOT where I have to learn a whole new system, to trust it.
Give me a MINI Schonstedt GA-52CX, and it will be the TOP of the stack. Put other stuff in it, so I can try it, and try to make it even better.

I do NOT like the metal detector to be TIED to the LS. This makes one unit stop working, while the other is being used. Often I have one of my sons running the LS, while I am using various digging tools, and a metal detector, to find the next place to take a shot.

And, last but not least, THANK you for lending your ear to the user.

Nate The Surveyor.
 
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Likewise I prefer the GA 92, but the J-tip is in my pouch ready to be clipped on. I modified a prism quick connect to attach or detach the J-tip quickly. Once you have found the generally dig zone, you can detach the J-tip and lay the LS down a couple feet away then hold the J-tip in your hand to fine tune where to dig as your excavation gets deeper.

After 50 years of this, the less bulky things I have to hike with the better.

Have not mastered the array of settings it has to the sweet spot settings I would like. A phone app I have works if your search zone can be close to the ground surface and only a couple feet in diameter, it seems to do better along chain link fences since it doesn't peak and vibrate when near the wire or posts only at the ends of a linear iron.
 

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Sdrake14

Active Member
That is a pretty good cross section of locators Nate, well thought out as usual. Thanks. In favor of less weight scrambling up slopes I have thought a bit about this and am wondering if anyone has experience using the pocket sized Garret-Pro pointer for survey applications? I have been tempted to test it since the price is not high....
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
am wondering if anyone has experience using the pocket sized Garret-Pro pointer for survey applications?

I bought one recently. I'm still getting used to its features, but it already helped me find a rebar that I never would have found with my Schonestedt. The rebar was at a steel pipe fence corner with steel pipe corner braces, all set in concrete. I had a rough stakeout position that landed within a foot of the fence corner, and since the Schonestedt was worthless with all that iron around I just started digging. I got down around a foot and was ready to conclude that the rebar had been taken out, but before I filled in the hole I decided to try the pinpointer. I stuck it in the hole and it started screaming, but I couldn't see anything (it was pretty dark with a lot of shadows). I reduced sensitivity, and it led me toward the edge of the hole at the edge of the concrete for one of the braces. I shined a light in the hole and saw that the rebar was embedded in the side of the concrete, and I had scraped about 6" of it with my shovel. I thought I was just hitting concrete, but there was the bar. So, given the price of admission, I'd say the pinpointer is definitely a good tool to have in the truck.
 
I agree with Jim about the Garrett Pro Pointer. I always carry it and my Schonstedt. I don't know how many times I have dug a deep hole where the Schonstedt indicated the pin was, only to find it at the side or outside of where I was digging, sometimes near the surface! The Garrett generally eliminates that problem. It's not too efficient for sweeping a large area and doesn't seem to work beyond few inches of depth in dirt, but it's great for refining and narrowing the search window. Mine came with a built in light that helps somewhat in dark sites.
 

avoidthelloyd

Active Member
I just got a new GA-52X and man I didn't realize how poor of shape my old one is in! What I LOVE about the Schonstedt standard is it's versatility! It is a machete for small limbs and briars, brush axe, pole vault pole, cattle prod, hammer, holds up barbed wire when I climb through fences and it will detect metal underground! Haha. I just carry it in my lath bag across my chest with my wood.
 

avoidthelloyd

Active Member
I bought one recently. I'm still getting used to its features, but it already helped me find a rebar that I never would have found with my Schonestedt. The rebar was at a steel pipe fence corner with steel pipe corner braces, all set in concrete. I had a rough stakeout position that landed within a foot of the fence corner, and since the Schonestedt was worthless with all that iron around I just started digging. I got down around a foot and was ready to conclude that the rebar had been taken out, but before I filled in the hole I decided to try the pinpointer. I stuck it in the hole and it started screaming, but I couldn't see anything (it was pretty dark with a lot of shadows). I reduced sensitivity, and it led me toward the edge of the hole at the edge of the concrete for one of the braces. I shined a light in the hole and saw that the rebar was embedded in the side of the concrete, and I had scraped about 6" of it with my shovel. I thought I was just hitting concrete, but there was the bar. So, given the price of admission, I'd say the pinpointer is definitely a good tool to have in the truck.
I just ordered one because of THAT story!
 
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