T-LS in the office

Aaron S

Active Member
I just run it through rams, my eyes are not as good as they once were, and rams enables everything to be larger, but very ingenious idea though, and its mobile.
RAMS is very, very good. But - It would be nice to have to option of doing it locally, to eliminate the slight network lag and make it feel like a standalone program. Also, you miss out on long-press with RAMS and some of the map touch functions. But I agree - it's a program.
 

Aaron S

Active Member
This thread is a great idea - I always love to see surveyors' inventions. Here's mine... You can see the "prototype" in the background, being used now as a pointless field book holder. The finished version is just 4 triangles and a board.

My TLS is totally beat to heck but it looks pretty good in this pic! The durability of this machine is incredible, especially the way I (inadvertently) abuse it.

IMG_20200630_071557.jpg
 

Matt Johnson

Well-Known Member
5PLS
RAMS is very, very good. But - It would be nice to have to option of doing it locally, to eliminate the slight network lag and make it feel like a standalone program. Also, you miss out on long-press with RAMS and some of the map touch functions. But I agree - it's a program.
This already exists: http://www.javad.com/jgnss/products/software/rams.html. The Desktop version has a built in server functionality and you can connect locally.

Also long clicks work in RAMS, just hold the mouse button down.
 

Aaron S

Active Member
Aaron: glad to see someone else still uses fieldbooks!
I still do for a couple reasons. Not really for recording measurements since our modern equipment stores it electronically, and writing them down is just introduces possibly of transcription errors. But I need them to record old corner ties, note their current status, and write down new ties if needed. I don't know another way to do that as easily as just writing it in a book.

Second, it's always good to have a narrative/story as to what happened out there - things the raw numbers can't describe, and there's only so many attributes you can give a point. I assumed everyone still used field books?
 
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