Netview File Transfer Speed

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
I transferred a file from my T2 to my desktop, and it seemed to take an inordinately long time. The T2 was connected to the desktop via USB, and the transfer speed was in the vicinity of 0.5MB per minute. As a comparison, I also downloaded the file to my phone via the Android app, and the speed was around 1.5MB per minute (still not what you'd call fast). But going through the phone means extra steps to then get it to my desktop.

Is this normal? Is there a better way to get files from the T2 to my desktop?
 

Kelly Bellis

ME PLS 2099
5PLS
NetView baud.PNG

Jim - As Matt mentioned, if you already have a connection at 115,200, you'll need to Dis(connect) first before going with the higher Baud Rate.
 

Kelly Bellis

ME PLS 2099
5PLS
I have no idea but easily can imagine that it harkens to an earlier day / legacy.

By the way, thanks for being here. I've been meaning to say that to you from the get go as it's good to see a gracefully aging and familiar face. I also have been meaning to see if you are the only one in the neighborhood here that can properly identify the following item, so Jim, please don't blurt out the answer too quickly ;)

A-Frame-Question.jpg
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
I started to say that it doesn't look familiar to me, but now I see that I have one sitting on my desk! It was the scale that threw me off. (Note to Shawn: I didn't use a Dremel tool when I modded mine, I used a drill press.)
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
Here's an uncropped photo:

temp.jpg


The cable is looped with a crimped sleeve, so I can either use a regular padlock to lock it to a bracket I've installed on a fixed-height tripod, or -- in a more general situation -- I can run another cable through the loop and lock that to something.

By the way, I was unsure of the chassis material at first, thinking it might even be plastic. I scraped a bit of the coating off and saw that it was shiny underneath, so I assumed aluminum. However, while drilling it didn't "feel" like aluminum, so when I was done I took the swarf and, ahem, "tested" it as shown here:


My conclusion is that the chassis is magnesium.
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
Also by the way, the cable is 7x19 3/32" stainless steel. A decent ($150) cable cutter will go through it like butter, but the stainless is hard enough and the stranding fine enough that it would be tough going with any garden-variety tools. In other words, it won't stop a determined thief, but it'll stop an opportunistic snatch-and-run creep, which is my primary goal.
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
I think the best method to lock base stations would be to add a slot so a laptop lock could be attached
The security value of most laptop locks is pretty low. The manufacturers make them look sturdy, but they're either poorly-designed or cheaply-made -- or both -- and thus vulnerable to a variety of brute-force attacks. Some of them require nothing more than a sharp rap with the handle of a screwdriver to make them pop open.

My solution may not be elegant, but absent a cable cutter -- which would also render a laptop lock useless -- it's fairly secure.
 

Matt Johnson

Well-Known Member
5PLS
The security value of most laptop locks is pretty low. The manufacturers make them look sturdy, but they're either poorly-designed or cheaply-made -- or both -- and thus vulnerable to a variety of brute-force attacks. Some of them require nothing more than a sharp rap with the handle of a screwdriver to make them pop open.

My solution may not be elegant, but absent a cable cutter -- which would also render a laptop lock useless -- it's fairly secure.
Like you said the purpose is more to stop an opportunistic snatch-and-run creep. Have you noticed how the base plate is attached to the T2? I could defeat your cable lock with a phillips screwdriver pretty quickly if I wanted to ;)
 

Jim Frame

Well-Known Member
https://www.osha.gov/dsg/combustibledust/

Machine tool swarf behaves differently, I assume due to the ratio of mass to surface area. In any case, aluminum swarf just kind of melts under a propane flame, but magnesium ignites and burns intensely, leaving a white oxide behind. I don't know about titanium, as I've never worked with it.

I'm sticking with an assessment of magnesium. Maybe someone from manufacturing will give us the real answer!
 
Top