Trajectories and an ATV

Adam

Well-Known Member
5PLS
Oh, the Eastern 21 acres was waist high to over my head high broomstraw and briars!
 

Joe Paulin

Active Member
Good deal! I love how easy it is to put stuff into google earth. I'm sure you saw, looks like a few floaters by the bank.
1552650283421.png
 

Tyler

Member
Trajectories made me some money today folks! 33 Acres - 5500 points. Time on site - 8:00 am to 3:30 pm which included an hour lunch and about an hour or two of set up and setting some control
https://www.dropbox.com/s/sfqgp5oo3mxzlpg/mclin.kmz?dl=0
Hey Adam, I worked on a job recently that would have allowed us to use an ATV to quickly locate points along an old road in a large ranch property. I'm curious what settings you used to accomplish this.
 

Tyler

Member
I set it to collect by distance travelled. 10'
So do you need to stop after every 10 feet for a few epochs to collect? I tried using the quick topo but i needed to stop for a second for it to collect the shot. What quick topo settings are used or what are the epochs that you set for a job like this? I would be curious how accurate you can expect a measurement to be when you are measuring on the go like that.
 

Nate The Surveyor

Well-Known Member
You are going to get more answers, and better answers, but....
Trajectory is very useful.
Tell it to Save all, not fixed only.
However, it came into acad, 180° out. I still have not figured out how (I suspect it is an acad issue) to make it come in right.
Nate
 

Darren Clemons

Well-Known Member
Trajectories are very “odd” to say the least to get used to at first but they work great once you get a feel for how to set them up.
You’ll need to set up a specific profile and you want to absolutely set the minimum engines to at least three engines - I’ve actually used a minimum of five several times. If you don’t set this higher than two engines you’ll get a ton of “bad shots” while driving. By setting it to three or more you’ll eliminate most, if not all of them.

Once you set your trajectory parameters of 2d or 3D distance for shots and have it in the profile that you’ve set up the chosen minimum engines you’ll watch the screen and see it store a shot every 10’/20’ or whatever distance you chose.

If, while driving, it falls under the minimum engines you’ve selected, just stop for a few seconds until it acquires the minimum number again and if it’s passed the distance interval it will automatically store a shot as soon as it does.

You’ll also need to use “tags” instead of codes or descriptions for each individual trajectory - ie “topo” or “T” is what I use. Each one you start will collect until you hit stop - 10 points to hundreds of points - depending on how far you drive.

Exporting the trajectories is also a bit different. You’ll need to scroll through the export screen until you find “all trajectories as points” or something similar - I’m not looking at my LS right now. When the correct tag/button is found, it will export all your individual trajectories at once. Just draw points in Acad (if that’s what you’re using) as they come in - don’t worry about point numbers or renumbering.

Draw the entire site you’ve topo’ed at about 0.1’ intervals at first and you’ll immediately pick up/see any anomalies of bad shots if you have any - they will be off in elevation and will “show” you an obvious high or low spot that looks abnormal....

If there are any, you can quickly identify them and delete from your file. Then, once those are filtered out, draw at interval you want/ need and then copy/paste those contour lines to original coordinates in your base dwg. (I do all the topo in a “trajectories” dwg separately for simplicity’s sake, then just copy out my final contour layer).
 

Adam

Well-Known Member
5PLS
Trajectories are very “odd” to say the least to get used to at first but they work great once you get a feel for how to set them up.
You’ll need to set up a specific profile and you want to absolutely set the minimum engines to at least three engines - I’ve actually used a minimum of five several times. If you don’t set this higher than two engines you’ll get a ton of “bad shots” while driving. By setting it to three or more you’ll eliminate most, if not all of them.

Once you set your trajectory parameters of 2d or 3D distance for shots and have it in the profile that you’ve set up the chosen minimum engines you’ll watch the screen and see it store a shot every 10’/20’ or whatever distance you chose.

If, while driving, it falls under the minimum engines you’ve selected, just stop for a few seconds until it acquires the minimum number again and if it’s passed the distance interval it will automatically store a shot as soon as it does.

You’ll also need to use “tags” instead of codes or descriptions for each individual trajectory - ie “topo” or “T” is what I use. Each one you start will collect until you hit stop - 10 points to hundreds of points - depending on how far you drive.

Exporting the trajectories is also a bit different. You’ll need to scroll through the export screen until you find “all trajectories as points” or something similar - I’m not looking at my LS right now. When the correct tag/button is found, it will export all your individual trajectories at once. Just draw points in Acad (if that’s what you’re using) as they come in - don’t worry about point numbers or renumbering.

Draw the entire site you’ve topo’ed at about 0.1’ intervals at first and you’ll immediately pick up/see any anomalies of bad shots if you have any - they will be off in elevation and will “show” you an obvious high or low spot that looks abnormal....

If there are any, you can quickly identify them and delete from your file. Then, once those are filtered out, draw at interval you want/ need and then copy/paste those contour lines to original coordinates in your base dwg. (I do all the topo in a “trajectories” dwg separately for simplicity’s sake, then just copy out my final contour layer).
Excellent
 

Shawn Billings

Shawn Billings
5PLS
I like setting trajectories to record by time and distance. All other collectors of which I am aware make you select one or the other. With both on you can increase point density by slowing down, such as crawling through a swale. If you only have distance only you might not catch the low point. Setting distance too insures that the density is consistent if you happen to go too fast for the time lapse to trigger a shot. Turning on minimum distance traveled keeps you from logging a rat nest when you stop while using time. A point won't be triggered unless the distance to the last shot is more than this setting.

Darren's advice above is spot on.
 

Darren Clemons

Well-Known Member
I like setting trajectories to record by time and distance. All other collectors of which I am aware make you select one or the other. With both on you can increase point density by slowing down, such as crawling through a swale. If you only have distance only you might not catch the low point. Setting distance too insures that the density is consistent if you happen to go too fast for the time lapse to trigger a shot. Turning on minimum distance traveled keeps you from logging a rat nest when you stop while using time. A point won't be triggered unless the distance to the last shot is more than this setting.

Darren's advice above is spot on.
Most of my advice above came from you Shawn ;)

I hadn’t tried the time AND distance...but I will. I’ll sometimes “cheat” my distance by driving a little out of straight line and then getting to my “low spot” when I feel it getting ready to store.....I’ve done a ton of driving topo’s - you get a knack for that sort of thing. Also, you can always just tap the “snap” box and it’ll store an “extra” shot wherever you tap that button....
 

Nistorescu Sorin

Active Member
It would be interesting to compare the LS/ATV mount versus T-F1 receiver (as rover, GNSS+IMU+Kalman filters), in a trajectory scenario:

T-F1.png


We believe that for trajectories, Triumph-F1 would have been the best rover in the field ever made by Javad. Maybe a future T3+IMU version..
 
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